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Course Descriptions

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 
ARABIC
CHINESE
CULTURAL STUDIES
FRENCH/FRANCOPHONE STUDIES
JAPANESE
KOREAN
PORTUGUESE
SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE


ASL 1 American Sign Language I (4)
Introduction to basic sign language and visual/gesture communication. GS-IV.

ASL 2 American Sign Language II (4)
The continuation of introductory sign language skills and culture. Pre-requisite: ASL 1 or equivalent. GS-IV.

ARABIC COURSES


ARB 1 Arabic I (4)
Introduction to reading, writing, speaking and understanding modern standard Arabic. This course is proficiency based and relies on student participation. It aims to place the student in the context of the native speaking environment through use of a textbook and introduction to authentic materials. GS-IV.

ARB 2 Arabic II (4)
This course is for students who have successfully completed Arabic I or its equivalent, or native or heritage speakers who can understand Arabic minimally and produce simple sentences. GS-IV. Prerequisite: ARB I or equivalent.

CHINESE COURSES


CHI 1 Elementary Chinese I (4)
Develops fundamental skills for reading, writing listening and speaking Chinese Mandarin. Students are also introduced to the cultural context of the language. GS-IV.

CHI 2 Elementary Chinese II (4)
Further develops the basic skills, stressing reading, writing. Continuous attention is paid to pronunciation, communication, and cultural context. Prerequisite: CHI 1 or equivalent. GS-IV.

CULTURAL STUDIES COURSES


CUL 11 Academic Communication Skills (3)
Level 1. This course emphasizes the four English communication skills to enhance students' performance in the higher education academic world. A strong oral component with discussions and presentations is included.

CUL 12/112 Multicultural Communities in Los Angeles (3)
Level 1. In this course, the students experience multicultural communities in Los Angeles and practice intercultural oral, written and research skills.

CUL 13/113 Academic Writing Skills (3)
Level 2. Students will focus on writing original academic research papers.

CUL 16/116 Intercultural Perspectives in the United States (3)
Level 2. Students increase their awareness and understanding of the people who live in different parts of the United States. Projects demonstrate their English oral and written skills, and include travel study.

CUL 50/150 Variety of Topics (1.0-4.0)
Culture 50/150 explores special cultural studies topics. The content will vary and will be defined each time the course is offered. This course may be repeated for credit if the content is different.

CUL 94/194 Study Travel (3)
Pre-travel lectures and readings, as well as guided tours in the country, serve as basis for a study/travel program, with each participant developing a project related to the travel experiences.

CUL 107A Theory and Practice of Culture (3)
This course addresses the growing domestic and global necessity for understanding and communication across cultural boundaries. This is a theoretical and practical approach to gain global awareness and understanding of cultural differences as well as similarities. Conducted in English. GS-VI. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to:
1. Recognize theories, concepts and themes related to the study of intercultural communication and cultural studies.
2. Identify cultures as dynamic, fluid and not static entities.
3. Provide examples of the various cultures in the United States and abroad.
4. Identify cross-cultural differences in perception.
5. Compare and contrast roles across cultures.
6. Explain the relationship between language and culture.

CUL 107B Intercultural Communication (3)
Cultural factors in interpersonal communication, such as perception, roles, language codes, and nonverbal communication. Students will apply and evaluate theories of intercultural communication, including examples of fiction, non-fiction narratives, and films.

CUL 108 World Literature in Translation (3)
This course explores major trends in world cultures through selected short stories and novels in translation from the 19th and 20th centuries. Conducted in English.

CUL 110 Culture through Films (3)
In order to gain global awareness and understanding, this course will examine diverse world cultures through a selection of documentaries and films. Conducted in English. Upon successful completion of Culture Through Films, students will:
1. Gain familiarity with some canonical films produced in Asia, Europe and Latin America since the 1948 up to date.
2. Analyze and critically appraise a wide range of films from an equally wide range of cultural studies and theoretical approaches.
3. Develop an informed understanding of the multidimensional nature of cultures.

CUL 114 Faces of Spirituality (3)
With the heritage of the CSJ in mind, the focus of this course is will be to survey a selection of world cultures to gain an understanding of how different cultures approach spirituality. Conducted in English.

CUL 115 Language and Culture (1-1.5)
This course explores diverse aspects of a selection of cultures through their portrayal in popular culture (film, television, arts, literature, music, Internet, food, fashion, etc.). Students will understand the role of language in shaping the identity of a nation and its influence in history and globalization. In addition to these goals, contemporary issues, youth culture, traditions and national image/values depicted through various means of popular culture will be examined. Conducted in English.

CUL 117 Women’s Literature in Translation (3)

This course explores the similarities and differences in women's conditions, aspirations and accomplishments as seen through literature written by women from around the globe.

CUL 119 Culture Through the Artist's Eyes (3)
This course will develop an understanding and appreciation for culture as expressed through art and for the creative process in different fields, from painting, sculpture, and dance, to film, music, literature, and poetry.

CUL 120 American-Chinese Encounters (3)
Through reading and discussion of fiction and non-fiction, students will explore similarities and differences in cultural outlooks of contemporary Chinese and Americans. This is a hybrid class, and you will have the opportunity to interact online with students from Nanjing University as an integral part of the course. This is a unique class which will allow you to explore contemporary outlooks and attitudes of both Chinese and Americans about education careers, families and much more.

CUL 121 Dance in Culture (3)
This course will explore dance across cultures and times.

CUL 122 Manners to Morals: An Anthropological Study of Society and Culture (3)
The distinction between manners and morals is often overlooked to the detriment of our ability to communicate, understand, appreciate and forgive each other. In this course we shall examine agreeable pleasures that are directed by manners, the rules of which are determined locally in social groups. In addition, we shall examine moral principles to see if they can be extended universally to our global culture. Finally, we shall compare and contrast the two manners and morals, to see if recognizing the division might result in less conflict and greater harmony for our often raucous and malicious humanity.

CUL 123 Asian Art (3)

This lecture course is a survey of 5 000 years of the art of India, China, Japan and Korea. Lectures, slides, films and readings provide a contextual framework for understanding the material.

CUL 124 Issues in Popular Culture (3)
This course examines contemporary issues in the globalization of popular culture and its impact on different societies around the world.

FRENCH/FRANCOPHONE STUDIES COURSES


FRE 1 Elementary French I (4)
This course will teach listening, speaking, reading and writing skills with a focus on communication. Students will learn how to talk about themselves, their friends and family, their courses, their living situation, and their leisure-time activities in French. They will also be introduced to the cultures of the French-speaking world. GS-IV. At the end of the semester, FRE 1 students should be able to:
1. Understand a basic conversation (audio or video) by native speakers.
2. Talk about themselves, their studies, their family, and hobbies.
3. Read and understand basic paragraphs, guess the meaning of words from context.
4. Write short paragraphs about themselves, their personalities, their studies, their living situation, their family, and hobbies.

FRE 2 Elementary French II (4)

This course continues to build upon the skills introduced in French 1. Students will advance in their listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing abilities. They will learn how to describe and narrate past events, and will be introduced to the different countries of the francophone world. Prerequisite: FRE 1 or equivalent. GS-IV. By the end of the semester, students in this course should be able to:
1. Understand a basic conversation (audio or video) by native speakers.
2. Talk about food, their leisure time activities, travel and clothing.
3. Read and understand basic paragraphs, guess the meaning of words from context.
4. Write short paragraphs about ordering food, their hobbies, holidays. They will also be able to describe trips they have taken, and clothing.

FRE 3/103 Intermediate French III (3)
This course is the first semester of second year French, and it is designed to build upon the skills acquired in French 1 and 2.  Students will develop a deeper knowledge of the French language and cultures. They will broaden their vocabulary and grammar skills, and expand their appreciation of many facets of today’s French life. They will read authentic texts and excerpts from French literature. Prerequisite: FRE 2 or equivalent. GS-IV. By the end of the semester, students in FRE 3 should be able to:
1. Understand a more complex conversation (audio or video) spoken by native speakers.
2. Talk about their personal relationships, the influence of the media, the French political and justice systems, and the evolution of the French society.
3. Read and understand longer texts, guess the meaning of words from context.
4. Write longer paragraphs about their personal relationships, their everyday routine and life in a big city, the impact of advertisement on the consumer, and finally societal issues.
5. Interpret and discuss literature and film at an intermediate level.
6. Develop knowledge of significant cultural and historical events.

FRE 4/104 Intermediate French IV (3)
This course is the last semester of second year French, and it is designed to deepen the students’ knowledge of the French language and cultures. They will continue to read excerpts from literary texts, and explore the diversity of the French and francophone world. This course will provide a strong foundation for subsequent upper division work in French language and literature. Prerequisite: FRE 3 or equivalent. GS-IV,VI. By the end of the semester, FRE 4 students should be able to:
1. Understand a more complex conversation (audio or video) spoken by native speakers: Radio France Internationale (RFI).
2. Talk about justice and politics, the evolution of the French society, conflicts between generations, science and technology.
3. Read and understand longer texts, guess the meaning of words from context.
4. Write longer paragraphs about societal issues, conflicts between generations, and technology.
5. Interpret and discuss literature and film at an intermediate level.
6. Develop knowledge of significant cultural and historical events.

FRE 33A/B French and Francophone Culture and Civilization (3)
This course offers a comprehensive approach, both historical and thematic, to better understand French and Francophone culture today. Topics of discussion include major social and historical developments, and literary and artistic movements. These courses are given in English only through the Weekend College. GS-IV.

FRE 101 French Writing Lab (3)

This course is an intensive training in writing. Students expand their vocabulary and they work on structural patterns and style. Materials include exercises in rhetoric, in creative and argumentative writing. Students learn to organize their ideas and to effectively communicate in writing. The course is taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 4/104.

FRE 112 History and Civilization of France (3)

This course covers the major events and cultural movements of the history and civilization of France, spanning from the Middle Ages, the French Renaissance, the glory of Versailles, and the Enlightenment. Topics of discussion cover the development and enrichment of the French language, nation building, and the enlightenment. Materials incorporate literary and philosophical texts (for example, Du Bellay, Racine, Montesquieu, Diderot), films and works of art. The course is taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 4/104.

FRE 114 Translation and Interpretation (3)

This course introduces students to the theory and the mechanics for written translation and basic oral interpretation. Students translate texts both from French into English and English into French. Prerequisite: basic fluency in both languages.

FRE 116 Contemporary Culture and Politics (3)

This course traces cultural changes in contemporary France since the end of World War II. Topics of discussion include the birth and development of the European Union and the role of France, the decolonization movement and its consequences, the social evolution and changes in France. Materials incorporate literary and philosophical texts by Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre and Franz Fanon to name a few, films and works of art. The course is taught in French and may be repeated with change of subject. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 118 18th Century Literature and Culture (3)

This course covers the Enlightenment period in France. The most important philosophers of the period will be studied: Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau and Diderot. This course is taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 119 19th Century Literature and Culture (3)
The nineteenth century has been called the Golden Age of French literature. This course studies authors who established the rules for Modern novelists, such as Balzac, Victor Hugo, Flaubert, Emile Zola. Topics of discussion also include French Romanticism and post-romanticism with poets such as Charles Baudelaire and Arthur Rimbaud. Materials incorporate literary text and works of art, impressionist paintings for instance. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 120 Francophone Literature (3)
This course will study the rich and vibrant literature produced outside of Metropolitan France. Topics of discussion include colonization and decolonization, immigration issues, women role and status in society, overseas French territories. Materials incorporate literary works from writers such as Albert Memmi, Assia Djebar, Ousmane Sembène, or Edouard Glissant, films and works of art. This course is taught in French, and may be repeated for credit with change of subject. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 122 Advanced Oral Expression (3)

This course is designed to develop students’ oral expression. They learn to present a main argument, to lead a discussion, and to actively participate to a debate. Students expand their vocabulary, and ease with oral expression. Materials introduce students to current topics of interest in France and the Francophone world. This course gives students a global perspective on important topics such as women issues, environmental issues etc… Prerequisite: FRE 4/104. By the end of the semester, FRE 122 students should be able to:
1. Carry on a conversation with native speakers.
2. Acquire a good pronunciation and diction in order to be able to communicate effectively with native and near-native speakers.
3. Understand native or near-native French speakers.

FRE 124 Introduction to the Analysis of Literary Masterpieces (3)
This course introduces students to literary genres: poetry, tragedies, comedies and prose. Principles of literary analysis are applied to selected texts in poetry, theater and prose. Materials include poems from La Pléaide, tragedies from Racine and Corneille, comedies from Molière, and prose texts from different French and Francophone writers. Prerequisite: FRE 101. By the end of the semester, FRE 124 students will:
1. Gain a variety of tools which will help them analyze a text in French through close reading.
2. Write more clearly and accurately.
3. Increase their vocabulary.
4. Improve their reading, speaking, and writing skills in French.
5. Increase further their cultural awareness as they learn how the French express their way of thinking through writing.

FRE 128 20th and 21st Century Culture and Literature (3)
From the Surrealists to the Nouveau Roman, this course focuses on some of the main French writers of the twentieth century, for example Albert Camus, André Malraux, Marcel Pagnol, and Natalie Sarraute. Various texts from Francophone literatures are also discussed to underline the dialogue between authors of various backgrounds and their influence on each other. Topics of discussion include the questioning of literary forms and genres, and self-image. GS-VI. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 130 French for Health Professionals (3)
This course focuses on medical vocabulary with an emphasis on communication. Prerequisite: FRE 4/104.

FRE 140 French/Francophone Women Writers in translation (3)
This course will analyze texts written by French and/or Francophone Women writers in the contexts of their times, civilization and culture. This course offers an overview of French and francophone literature written by women throughout the centuries, with writers ranging from Marie de France, Madame de Lafayette, Madame de Staël, George Sand, Marguerite Duras and Assia Djebar. We will examine the narrative techniques that each of these writers uses to address issues of gender, sexuality and identity. In English, with readings in French for majors. GS-VI. Prerequisite for majors: FRE 124.

FRE 148 French and Francophone Cinema (3)
This course presents French and Francophone Cinema, from its early days and following its transformation through the 21st century. Topics of discussion cover the Films Noirs genre, the Nouvelle Vague, the New French Cinema, and the study of a specific French or Francophone director. The course is taught in French and may be repeated for credit with change of subject. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 149 Business French (3)
This course introduces French and Canadian business practices and culture. Topics of discussion include traditional businesses, career practices, communication skills, as well as cultural concepts particular to French businesses. Prerequisite: FRE 4/104.

FRE 50/150 Special Topics (3)
This course fosters the exploration of special interest areas, such as Francophone Cinema or literature, French Cuisine, or French Philosophers, for instance. The course content is defined and announced when the course is offered. The course is taught in French and may be repeated for credit with change of subject. Prerequisite: FRE 124.

FRE 190A/B Internship (3)
Internship/cooperative experience programs in areas related to French culture or international business.

FRE 191 Senior Thesis (3)
This course is two-semester directed research project required for majors under the direction of a department faculty member. The topic of the thesis must be approved by the department chairperson. Students must enroll in their thesis course no later than the first semester of their senior year.

FRE 194 Study/Travel (1-6)

This course offers pre-travel lectures and readings, as well as guided tours in the country, which serve as basis for a study/travel program, with each participant developing a project highlighting the travel experiences.

FRE 196H Senior Honors Thesis (3)
Open only to students admitted to the Honors Program.

FRE 198A/B Directed Readings (3)
Directed readings selected from authors representative of significant literary periods.

FRE 199A/B Independent Studies (1-3)
Directed research. For qualified students with the approval of the department.

JAPANESE COURSES


JPN 1 Elementary Japanese I (4)
This course develops the student's four communication skills. The course reviews selected grammar, builds vocabulary and Kanji. The different levels of politeness in speech are introduced. The course also covers topics that enhance the student's awareness and understanding of Japanese culture. GS-IV. Upon successful completion of JPN 1, students will:
1. Greet others and introduce themselves briefly.
2. Ask simple questions.
3. Read and write sentences combining hiragana, katakana, and kanji acquired during the semester.
4. Understand the basic structure of Japanese.

JPN 2 Elementary Japanese II (4)

This course continues perfecting the student's four communication skills. By extensive aural/oral and reading/writing exercises, the student achieves further proficiency in the target language. It focuses on building vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and Kanji to help students discuss and write essays with enough ease on selected topics including Japanese culture, literature, and history. Prerequisite: Japanese 1 or equivalent. GS-IV. Upon successful completion of JPN 2, students will:
1. Develop skills in identifying the speech style appropriate for the situation, as well as the speaker’s relationship with the interlocutor.
2. Carry out conversations resourcefully in situations such as talking about families and friends, expressing thoughts and opinions, ordering food in a restaurant, making reservations at the travel agency.
3. Master comparison, the short form (non-past and past tense), and the –te form of adjectives.
4. Read and write paragraphs combining hiragana, katakana, and kanji acquired during the semester.
5. Express one’s thought as well as to ask directions, to explain one’s symptoms at a hospital, choosing either the plain or the polite form and the appropriate level of politeness.

JPN 3 Intermediate Japanese III (3)

This course continues developing the students' four communication skills in Japanese: speaking listening, writing, and reading. It consists of reviews of Japanese grammar, vocabulary building and expansion of Kanji. Oral discussion and conversation are based on selected topics appropriate to the level. Prerequisite: Japanese 2. GS-IV.

JPN 4 Intermediate Japanese IV (3)
This course concentrates on further perfecting the student's four communication skills. It focuses on the review of functional Japanese grammar with emphasis on idiomatic construction and expression. The difference between spoken and written Japanese, and different levels of politeness in speech are studied along with select features of Japanese culture, history, art, literature, and Japanese political and economic system. Prerequisite: Japanese 3.

JPN 5 Practical Conversation (3)

This course is designed to develop effective oral communication skills. It focuses on the use of practical phrases, idiomatic expressions, and useful vocabulary suitable for various situations, and develops the ability to communicate in a given situation. The Japanese writing systems are not introduced in this course. Provides a basic understanding of the culture of modern Japan. This course does not fulfill the language requirement. Prerequisite: None.

JPN 194 Travel/Study (1.0-6.0)
Pre-travel lectures, readings, and sessions of learning and using basic Japanese conversation as well as guided tours in the country serve as basis for a study/travel program, with each participant developing a project highlighting the travel experiences. Prerequisite: None. May be repeated for credit.

KOREAN COURSES


KRN 1 Elementary Korean I (4)
Korean 1 develops basic communication skills that the student practices in Korean culture environment. GS-IV.

KRN 1A Korean Culture (1)
Korean 1A introduces vocabulary skills and fundamental sentence structures in the present and past. Pronunciation, grammar and everyday vocabulary are stressed as essential tools for comprehension and expression. Aspects of Korean Culture are covered as well.

KRN 2 Elementary Korean II (4)
This course continues improving communication skills that students practice in real Korean cultural environments. GS-IV.

KRN 3 Intermediate Korean III (2.0-4.0)
This course is an introduction to standard spoken and written Korean with emphasis on conversation.

KRN 4 Intermediate Korean IV (1.0-4.0)
Korean 4 is designed for students with no formal or very limited formal instruction. Emphasis on spelling, basic grammar, reading, writing, and daily conversation. 

PORTUGUESE COURSES


POR 1 Elementary Portuguese I (4)
Students learn fundamental basic language skills to communicate in cultural Brazilian, Portuguese or African Lusophone situations. GS-IV.

POR 2 Elementary Portuguese II (4)
Students learn fundamental basic language skills to communicate in cultural Brazilian, Portuguese or African Lusophone situations. GS-IV.

SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES


SPA 1 Elementary Spanish I (4)    

Introduction to Spanish through a variety of communicative approaches in order to develop the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on speaking and listening as well as grammar and writing. GS-IV. By the end of this course, students in SPA 1 will:
1. Understand cultural greeting differences.
2. Ask classmates their names and where they are from.
3. Find out about other’s majors and report (orally and in writing) on majors and classes, including subjects classmates like or dislike.
4. Describe, ask and answer questions and make comparisons related to people’s daily routines.
5. Describe (orally and in writing) one’s ideal weekend and compare how people spend their leisure time.
6. Relate the weather, seasons, months of the year to leisure times activities.
7. Ask and answer questions about last night’s and last week’s activities.
8. Describe (orally and in writing) one’s own nuclear and extended family.
9. Ask classmates about their family trees and draw and label them.
10. Describe (orally and in writing) people’s physical appearance and understand descriptions given by others.
11. List some personality traits and relate these to family characteristics.
12. Describe (orally and in writing) some basic foods and snacks and report what one eats for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
13. Examine how some eating habits in Spanish-speaking countries differ from those in the U.S.

SPA 2 Elementary Spanish II (4)    
This course is a continuation of Spanish 1. Further develops the fundamental skills stressing reading and writing. Emphasis will be placed on communication, grammar, and vocabulary building. Students will explore the diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, including food, fashion, music, arts, and literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1 or equivalent. GS-IV. At the end of the semester, SPA 2 students will:
1. Conjugate verbs correctly in the present indicative and subjunctive, present progressive, present perfect, preterit, imperfect, past progressive, pluperfect, future and conditional.
2. Use correctly the present indicative, present progressive, present perfect, pluperfect and the formal and informal commands.
3. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of the present subjunctive to make recommendations and refer to anticipated events.
4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of when and how to use preterit, imperfect and past progressive in a narrative.
5. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of the future to express plans.
6. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of the conditional to express hypothetical possibilities.
7. Demonstrate a clear understanding of the contrast between SER and ESTAR.
8. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of how to use POR and PARA.
9. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the use of reflexive and reciprocal constructions, the impersonal "se", prepositional pronouns and direct /indirect object pronouns and their placement.
10. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the pronominalization of adjectives (descriptive, possessive and demonstrative).
11. Use negative and affirmative expressions appropriately.
12. Demonstrate a working knowledge of verbs like GUSTAR.
13. Understand cultural greeting differences.
14. Ask classmates their names and where they are from.
15. Find out about each other’s majors and report (orally and in writing) on majors and classes, including subjects classmates like or dislike.
16. Describe, ask and answer questions and make comparisons related to people’s daily routines.
17. Describe (orally and in writing) one’s ideal weekend and compare how people spend their leisure time.
18. Relate the weather, seasons, months of the year to leisure times activities.
19. Ask and answer questions about last night’s and last week’s activities.
20. Describe (orally and in writing) one’s own nuclear and extended family.
21. Ask classmates about their family trees and draw and label them.
22. Describe (orally and in writing) people’s physical appearance and understand descriptions given by others.
23. List some personality traits and relate these to family characteristics.
24. Describe (orally and in writing) some basic foods and snacks and report what one eats for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
25. Examine how some eating habits in Spanish-speaking countries differ from those in the U.S.

SPA 3 Intermediate Spanish III (3)    

This is the logical continuation of Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 for students who are not Spanish-speakers. Emphasis on conversation and oral comprehension. Prerequisite: SPA 2 or equivalent. GS-IV. By the end of the semester, SPA 3A students will:
1. Discuss political beliefs and ideologies and the value of ideas.
2. Discuss current social issue and problems.
3. Create a formal discussion of the aforementioned topics.
4. Learn the rules and uses of the accents in the Spanish language.
5. Express superlatives and comparisons.
6. Express condition, purpose or intent using the subjunctive form.
7. Make reference to recently completed actions, past actions that still have relevance in the present, using the indicative and subjunctive present perfect.
8. Make reference to actions that had been done or had occurred before another action in the past using the indicative and subjunctive past perfect.
9. Make reference to what will have happened at specific point using the future perfect tense.
10. Make reference to what would have occurred but did not using the conditional perfect tense.
11. Make reference to conjecture or probability about a past action using the conditional perfect tense.
12. Distinguish between formal and colloquial forms of communication.
13. Gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of the various cultures that encompass the Spanish-Speaking world.
14. Read, analyze and discuss short stories from some of the most renowned Spanish writers from different Spanish-speaking countries.
15. Explore particular cultural, social and historical events of the Spanish-speaking world.
16. Write a short research paper following the MLA guidelines.

SPA 3A Accelerated Spanish III (3)    
This is a fast-track course for students who can communicate orally in Spanish but need to improve their grammar, vocabulary, and spelling. Prerequisite: SPA 2 or equivalent. GS-IV. At the end of the semester, SPA 3 students will:
1. Discuss political beliefs and ideologies and the value of ideas.
2. Discuss current social issue and problems.
3. Create a formal discussion of the aforementioned topics.
4. Learn the rules and uses of the accents in the Spanish language.
5. Express superlatives and comparisons.
6. Express condition, purpose or intent using the subjunctive form.
7. Make reference to recently completed actions, past actions that still have relevance in the present, using the indicative and subjunctive present perfect.
8. Make reference to actions that had been done or had occurred before another action in the past using the indicative and subjunctive past perfect.
9. Make reference to what will have happened at specific point using the future perfect tense.
10. Make reference to what would have occurred but did not using the conditional perfect tense.
11. Make reference to conjecture or probability about a past action using the conditional perfect tense.
12. Distinguish between formal and colloquial forms of communication.
13. Gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of the various cultures that encompass the Spanish-Speaking world.
14. Read, analyze and discuss short stories from some of the most renowned Spanish writers from different Spanish-speaking countries.
15. Explore particular cultural, social and historical events of the Spanish-speaking world.
16. Write a short research paper following the MLA guidelines.

SPA 4 Intermediate Spanish IV (3)    
This course is a continuation of Spanish 3 or Spanish 3A with an introduction to the literature and cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPA 3/SPA 103, SPA 3A/SPA 103A, or equivalent. GS-IV, VI. By the end of this course, students are expected to:
1. Express condition, purpose or intent using the subjunctive form.
2. Make reference to recently completed actions, or past actions that still have relevance in the present, using the indicative and subjunctive and the present perfect.
3. Make reference to actions that had been done or had occurred before another action in the past using the indicative and subjunctive past perfect, as well as the preterit and imperfect.
4. Make reference to what will have happened at specific point using the future perfect tense.
5. Express superlatives and make comparisons.
6. Make reference to probability regarding a past action using the future perfect tense.
7. Make reference to conjecture or probability about a past action using the conditional perfect tense.
8. Distinguish between formal and colloquial forms of communication.
9. Express themselves fluently in familiar topics.
10. Use critical and analytical reasoning in oral and written communication.
11. Understand and use the conventions of written language, have a sense of syntax, punctuation, and strong knowledge of accent marks.
12. Analyze and discuss political and cultural beliefs and ideologies, as well as current global social issues.

SPA 8 Oral Comprehension and Conversation (3)
Intensive practice in oral communication both formal and spontaneous. Emphasis on vocabulary building and the acquisition of idiomatic speech patterns. Prerequisite: SPA 2 or instructor's consent.

SPA 9 Intermediate Spanish Readings (3)
Literary and journalistic texts from Spain and from Latin America will be read and discussed, to improve reading and conversational skills and underline cultural variances. Prerequisite: SPA 2 or instructor's consent.

SPA 10A Spanish Phonetics I (1.0-3.0)
This course is an introduction to the study of the Spanish sounds and how they are produced. Students will learn many of the most common phonetic symbols while placing emphasis on those sounds unique to Spanish. Phonetic differences between English and Spanish will be discussed. Taught in English and Spanish.

SPA 25 Writing Composition and Grammar (3)
The emphasis is on writing and composition skills with intensive review of verbs and grammatical structures. Prerequisite: SPA 2 or equivalent.

SPA 33A Civilizations and Cultures of Spain (3)
A general view of historical, social, and cultural developments in Spain up to today. This course is offered in English through the Weekend College only. GS-IV.    

SPA 33B Civilizations and Cultures of the Americas (3)    
Highlights of civilization of Spanish-America, with emphasis on artistic, economic, social, and historical development as background for upper division courses. This course is offered in English through the Weekend College only. GS-IV, VI.    

SPA 107A Theory and Practice of Culture (3)
The course addresses the growing domestic and global necessity for understanding and communication across cultural boundaries. This is a theoretical and practical approach to gain global awareness and understanding of cultural differences as well as similarities. Conducted in English.

SPA 107B Cultural Models and Global Realities (3)
This course features the intercultural dynamics within global socio-political communities. Students will analyze historical events that facilitate their understanding of methodological concepts such as cosmopolitanism in present day societies. This course will include a service learning component that will offer students the opportunity to interview and interact with different cultures through Los Angeles. Conducted in English.    

SPA 109 Spanish Writing Lab (3)
Intensive creative and noncreative writing course with emphasis on vocabulary development and idiomatic expression.

SPA 110 Chicano & Other Spanish-American Literature in the U.S. (3)    
This course offers a representative overview of Chicano and other Spanish-American literary production covering five genres: poetry, theater, novel, short story, and essay. An historical framework is outlined to establish the different periods of Spanish-American creativity from its origins in the U.S. to contemporary times, using a series of works and authors to illustrate their representative social context. Conducted in English.

SPA 111 Spanish-Language Media Writing (3)
Through innovative teaching techniques, this course will guide students in the methods and styles of reporting and writing in Spanish for print, online, and broadcast. It will prepare students to work for Spanish media outlets. Conducted in English and Spanish.

SPA 112 History and Civilization of Spain (3)

A background course for the study of the arts and literature of Spain, focusing on historical, social, and cultural developments. Emphasis on cultural differences and similarities.

SPA 113 Reporting and News in Spanish (3)

This course will explore Spanish/Latino reporting. A service learning component is included.

SPA 114A Introduction to Translation/Interpretation (3)

This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts, theories and strategies for translation and interpretation from Spanish to English. Students will translate Spanish texts which may include legal, business, medical, social and literary. In addition, students will examine different approaches to idiomatic expressions non-equivalents, tenses and grammatical structures. Prerequisite: Fluency in both languages. Oral Placement Test.

SPA 114B Translation/Interpretation (3)
This course will continue to acquaint students with concepts, theories and strategies for translation at an advanced level. Focus will be placed on translation and interpretation from English to Spanish. Students will review the fundamentals of written Spanish grammar as prescribed in the latest revision of La Real Academia Española and make contrastive analysis between the source and the target language's written form. Translation of texts from the individual student's field(s) of interest will include, but are not limited to, legal, business medical, social and literary.

SPA 15/115/215 Contrastive Linguistics (3)

This course is designed to teach students of any field to communicate effectively in written and oral form, gain critical, problem solving, research and analytical skills in English and Spanish. The course will introduce the student to modern descriptive linguistics that focuses on first and second language phonology, morphology, syntax, and other structural elements. In addition, the relationship between linguistics and other fields of study such as Psychology, Sociology, and Neuroscience will be explored. Students will be required to do field research in a topic related to the course. The course can be particularly beneficial to those doing service learning, teaching a first or a second language, working as an interpreter, among others. Taught in English. Research in Spanish or English.

SPA 125 Spanish Masterpieces (3)
A study of the masterpieces of Spanish literature with emphasis on works by Cervantes, Calderón, Feijoo, Zorilla, Galdós, and Blasco Ibanez, among others.

SPA 27/127/227 Spanish for Health Professionals (3)    
An introduction to medical vocabulary with emphasis on communication, on medical vocabulary and role playing. Prerequisite: Elementary knowledge of Spanish useful, but not required. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of Spanish in oral and written expression.
2. Use the medical terminology taught in Spanish in appropriate situations.
3. Conjugate verbs correctly in the present indicative, present progressive, preterit, and informal (immediate) future.
4. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of the future to express plans.
5. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the use of reflexive and reciprocal constructions, direct / indirect object pronouns and their placement.
6. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the demonstrative adjectives.
7. Use negative and affirmative expressions appropriately.
8. Demonstrate a working knowledge of por / para.

SPA 129 Cervantes’ Don Quixote (3)
A course analyzing Don Quixote and a selection of Cervantes' short stories.

SPA 132 Studies in the Generation of 1898 (3)
A study of the Generation of `98 as reflected in the works of major representative authors.

SPA 135 Contemporary Spanish Literature (3)
Major trends of twentieth and twenty-first century poetry, prose, and other genres of literature.

SPA 140 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature (3)
A study of the most outstanding works by contemporary Spanish and Spanish-American writers such as Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes, Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and others, including women writers and emerging writers. GS-VI.

SPA 44/144/244 Spanish-speaking Civilizations and Cultures in the Americas and Spain (3)    
Advanced variable topics course that studies diverse aspects of Hispanic culture, civilization, and history. Conducted in Spanish and English. GS-VI (HIS 162).

SPA 145 Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking Peoples in the United States and California (3)
Various historical and modern aspects of the cultures and their roles within the United States and California. Includes origins, values, communication and socialization systems, migration and immigration patterns, as well as relationships with other cultures. Conducted in English.

SPA 146 Women Writers in Spanish-American Literature (3)
Topical study of selected works of Spanish-American women, exploring women's literary traditions and their relationships to mainstream literary movements. Application of recent rends in literary theory and critical methodologies are emphasized. GS-VI.

SPA 148 Film and Literature in Spanish-America (3)
Analysis of main aesthetic, cultural, and philosophical questions in the Spanish-American world as articulated in selected literature and films. The selection of films and texts will highlight issues related to the representation of history as well as questions of identity, race, ethnicity, class, and gender to gain global awareness and understanding. Conducted in both English and Spanish.

SPA 49/149 Spanish for the Business World (3)
An introduction to the forms, styles, usages and procedures followed in commercial correspondence and business practices in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPA 50/150 Chicano/Latino Literature (3)
This course will explore Chicano/Latino literature through various literary genres and the context that prompted the creation of these texts. The focus will be on Chicano writers and other authors from Central and South America, Cuba, and Puerto Rico writing in the United States. Conducted in English.

SPA 151 Spanish/Latin American Theater in Los Angeles (1)

Students will explore and enjoy Spanish/Latin American Theater in Los Angeles.

SPA 52/152 Spanish/Latin Dance in Los Angeles (1)
Students will learn about Spanish/Latin American dances in Los Angeles and their countries.

SPA 190 A/B/C Internship Program (3)
Internship program in an area related to the student's emphasis and professional interest.

SPA 191 Senior Thesis (3)
Directed research project required for Spanish/Latin American Studies majors. The topic of research may be related to the student's personal and academic interests. Students must enroll in their thesis course no later than the first semester of their senior year.

Featured Senior Thesis:  Footsteps in the desert

SPA 194 Study/Travel (1.0-6.0)
Pre-travel lectures and readings as well as guided tours in the country will serve as a basis for a study/travel program, with each participant developing a research project that reflects their personal and academic interests.

SPA 195 Latin America in Los Angeles (1)
Students will explore the unknown Latin America in Los Angeles.

SPA 196H Senior Honors Thesis (1)
Open only to students admitted to the Honors Program.

SPA 198A/B Directed Readings (3)
Directed readings selected from authors representative of significant literary periods. May be repeated for credit.

SPA 199 A/B Independent Study (1.0-3.0)
Directed readings and research. For qualified students with the approval of the department. May be repeated for credit.