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Creative Writing 05 Abstract Colours

Summer 2018

CRW 242 Writing for the Screen II (Lecture) - Jehnovah Carlisle

This course provides an overview of feature film story structure and detailed instruction on creating the "blueprint" for storytelling that we call the outline. Students will learn standard Hollywood film story structure, as well as how to construct scenes with compelling action, believable reactions and escalating conflict that builds within the scene, while also elevating the stakes of the entire story. Students are expected to complete a full outline with 50 - 100 scenes for their original feature film by the end of the semester. Writing for the Screen I or II may be taken in either sequence.

CRW 248 W_I Special Topics: Gabriel García Márquez (Lecture) - Margarita Borrero

This summer course leads students through several of García Márquez’s stories and novels amidst one of the most beautiful and iconic cities of magic realism, Cartagena de Indias in Colombia. Please see Study Abroad.

CRW 248 W_II Special Topics: Crónica: Latin American Tradition of Non-Fiction (Lecture) - Lisa Fetchko

This course focuses on writers from Latin America against the backdrop of one the most historically significant cities in the Americas. We will look at the history of nonfiction as a genre and its explosive transformation over the last 75 years. Please see Study Abroad.

CRW 296 Thesis (Lecture) - JoAnna Novak

Required for completion of the degree is submission of a publication-ready, 100-page manuscript in one genre-fiction, creative non-fiction, screen play or teleplay, or 50 pages of poetry - closely reviewed, edited and refined with the assistance of the student's Thesis Committee.

CRW 297A Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 297B Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 297C Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 297D Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 299 C Publishing Seminar (Lecture) - David Shook

This course provides a theory-grounded and practice-driven introduction to the writing, editing, and publishing of books and magazines. It is designed for students who plan future careers as writers or in the wider world of publishing. Students will learn about the socioeconomic and sociocultural importance of publishing by reading the work by major contemporary authors in the field. Topics include the history and present state of independent publishing in the United States and beyond, the economics of the industry, current challenges, and future trends.

 

Fall 2018

CRW 230 Fiction Writing (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Using close reading, workshops, criticism, games and exercises, this blended course will give you the means with which to write 80 pages of a novel.  Significant class time is dedicated to learning essentials of technique such as the uses of point of view, dialogue and description and how to build a scene. Online study in between times will reinforce what we do in the classroom and allow you to revise and take your ideas further.  In our live meetings, we will dialogue and critique your and your classmates’ novel chapters, while continuing to read and discuss novels from the U.S., Ireland, Peru and Mexico.  The novels will be read in the following order: Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing; Lisa McInerney, The Glorious Heresies; Jennifer Egan, Manhattan Beach; Juan Rulfo, Pedro Paramo and Mario Vargas Llosa, The Bad Girl. The craft textbook will be Phillip Stevick, The Theory of the Novel.

CRW 231 Poetry Writing I (Online) – JoAnna Novak

In this course, we'll work as a community of poets to experiment with methods of composition, share poems in workshop, revise with abandon, and, of course, read widely. Our focus will be poetry and the spiritual, the occult, and the mystical. Our course texts will include works by Jack Spicer, Mina Loy, Melissa Broder, Dorothea Lasky, Charles Wright, and more. Sharing our own words, we'll practice—through thoughtful repetition—what it means to be a poet.

CRW 232 Film Writing II (Lecture) – Sarah Louise Wilson

This class is highly encouraged for driven people who have a great story that they want to share with the world. After all, if you don’t tell your story, someone else will. This workshop fully immerses each student in an intensive and focused course of study, providing a solid structure for writing a feature film treatment and a completed feature length screenplay. Students will learn the craft of writing by gaining an understanding of story, structure, character, conflict, and dialogue. With strict adherence to professional standards and self-discipline, students will complete a treatment along with a feature length script. Workshop sessions will create an environment in which students evaluate their own and their classmates’ work. A constructive, creative and supportive atmosphere will prevail, where students will guide and encourage each other in their writing. Class readings will include: Story by Robert McKee; The Anatomy of Story by John Truby; Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting by Syd Field; The Art of Dramatic Writing by Lajos Egri; The Writer’s Journey by Christopher Vogler and Save the Cat! by Blake Snyder.

CRW 248 ST: Fairytales (Online) – JoAnna Novak

Contemporary feminist fairy tale writer Angela Carter once wrote, "Ours is a highly individualized culture, with a great faith in the work of art as a unique one-off, and the artist as an original, a godlike and inspired creator of unique one-offs. But fairy tales are not like that, nor are their makers. Who first invented meatballs? In what country? Is there a definitive recipe for potato soup? Think in terms of the domestic arts. ‘This is how I make potato soup.’” In this course, we'll explore the long tradition of fairy tales, focusing on the forms and structures that characterize these stories. In addition to reading classics by Charles Perrault, The Grimm Brothers, and Hans Christen Andersen, we will also explore modern and contemporary versions of these stories, reading authors including Kate Bernheimer, Helen Oyeyemi, Carmen Maria Machado, Angela Carter, and more. We'll also experiment with writing fairy tales and fairy tale-inspired work in a number of forms.

CRW 296 Thesis (Lecture) – JoAnna Novak

Required for completion of the degree is submission of a publication-ready, 100-page manuscript in one genre-fiction, creative non-fiction, screen play or teleplay, or 50 pages of poetry - closely reviewed, edited and refined with the assistance of the student's Thesis Committee.

CRW 297D Thesis Continuation

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.