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Schedule

Creative Writing 05 Abstract Colours

Spring 2018

CRW 232 Screenwriting: Film Lab (Lecture) - Andrew Ruiz

The short film is often dismissed as a stepping stone to a larger project, but is more often a purer example of the filmmaker's vision. In this course, we will revisit these under-appreciated works. The screenings will take us all over the world, exposing us to a wide range of experiences and styles. Through thorough examination of these shorts, both in-class and individually, we will seek the narrative magic that makes this form work. We will then apply that same magic to our own work. In this course, you will create and revise three different short screenplays. The goal is to complete the semester with three polished scripts, ready for production. Readings will include Robert McKee - Story, David Howard and Edward Mabley - Tools of Screenwriting, and Linda Seger - How to Make a Good Script Great.

CRW 246 Playwriting I (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

This course focuses on mastering these essentials of dramatic technique: plot, story, character, thought, diction, melody and spectacle. Our text will be Sam Smiley's Playwriting: The Structure of Action. We will read Plays From the Contemporary American Theater, featuring playwrites such as Tina Howe and August Wilson, gauging how each is made, and what it has to offer you as a playwrite in progress. You will practices technique through exercises and writing a series of scenes for 2 to 3 characters. We will workshop these writings as a group, while you begin to create the two-act play that will culminate the semester. We will also maintain a blog raising and discussing ideas about theater in performance.

CRW 241 Poetry Workshop II (Lecture) - JoAnna Novak

In this course, we'll work as a community of poets to experiment with methods of composition, share poems in workshop, revise with abandon, and, of course, read widely. Texts will include contemporary poetry by Danez Smith, Layli Long Soldier, sam sax, and Kaveh Akbar; videos by avant-garde filmmakers; and craft essays. Sharing our own words, we'll practice--through thoughtful repetition--what it means to be a poet.

CRW 243 Creative Non-Fiction II (Lecture) - JoAnna Novak

The personal essayist often adopts a rakish or witty persona, but, let's be honest: being funny is hard work. Our course texts will include essays by David Sedaris, Roxane Gay, Sherman Alexie, David Rakoff, and Nora Ephron; as well as craft essays and documentaries. You'll develop your own humorous creative nonfiction; read and workshop pieces written by your peers; practice strategies for revision; and compile a portfolio of work that you feel ready to submit to literary magazines and journals.

CRW 248 Special Topics in CRW: Autofiction (Lecture) - JoAnna Novak

Like most compelling literature, autofiction, or fictionalized autobiography, raises more questions than it answers. How does autofiction differ from autobiography or memoir? Why would a writer stake this claim about their work? In this seminar we will read Karl Ove Knausgaard, W.G. Sebald, Serge Doubrovsky, Catherine Cusset, and other practitioners of autofiction while examining the philosophies and theories associated with this unique form; we will also experiment with writing our own short form autofiction.

 

Summer 2018

CRW 242 Writing for the Screen II (Lecture) - Jehnovah Carlisle

This course provides an overview of feature film story structure and detailed instruction on creating the "blueprint" for storytelling that we call the outline. Students will learn standard Hollywood film story structure, as well as how to construct scenes with compelling action, believable reactions and escalating conflict that builds within the scene, while also elevating the stakes of the entire story. Students are expected to complete a full outline with 50 - 100 scenes for their original feature film by the end of the semester. Writing for the Screen I or II may be taken in either sequence.

CRW 248 W_I Special Topics: Gabriel García Márquez (Lecture) - Margarita Borrero

This summer course leads students through several of García Márquez’s stories and novels amidst one of the most beautiful and iconic cities of magic realism, Cartagena de Indias in Colombia. Please see Study Abroad.

CRW 248 W_II Special Topics: Crónica: Latin American Tradition of Non-Fiction (Lecture) - Lisa Fetchko

This course focuses on writers from Latin America against the backdrop of one the most historically significant cities in the Americas. We will look at the history of nonfiction as a genre and its explosive transformation over the last 75 years. Please see Study Abroad.

CRW 296 Thesis (Lecture) - JoAnna Novak

Required for completion of the degree is submission of a publication-ready, 100-page manuscript in one genre-fiction, creative non-fiction, screen play or teleplay, or 50 pages of poetry - closely reviewed, edited and refined with the assistance of the student's Thesis Committee.

CRW 297A Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 297B Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 297C Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 297D Thesis Continuation (Lecture) - Johnny Payne

Students who need a little more time to finish their theses may register for up to 4 additional one-units.

CRW 299 C Publishing Seminar (Lecture) - David Shook

This course provides a theory-grounded and practice-driven introduction to the writing, editing, and publishing of books and magazines. It is designed for students who plan future careers as writers or in the wider world of publishing. Students will learn about the socioeconomic and sociocultural importance of publishing by reading the work by major contemporary authors in the field. Topics include the history and present state of independent publishing in the United States and beyond, the economics of the industry, current challenges, and future trends.